Slow down, life sciences: why the industry’s not ready for consumer technologies in clinical settings

Frank Traina

Frank Traina

The life sciences industry is changing at a remarkable rate. While many companies specializing in pharmaceuticals, biotechnology, and medical products and devices have embraced consumer technologies, others stand uncertainly at the gate, weighing the price of entry. As my colleague Sameer noted, the opportunities are numerous, including improved patient care, lower TCO, greater productivity, and compliance with regulatory and consumer demands. But as many companies are learning the hard way, there are also significant barriers to adopting consumer technologies in clinical settings. Read more of this post

Key takeaways from NRF’s BIG Show 2014

 Ian Rogers

Ian Rogers

National Retail Federation’s 103rd annual BIG Show broke records with 30,000 attendees, 500 exhibitors, and 120 educational sessions. As usual, all the hot topics on the minds of today’s retailers were on the agenda, as well as a broad range of diverse technology exhibits.

Leading retailers from across the country were present, with different business goals but a seemingly shared vision: improve the customer shopping experience across multiple channels—online and off. Here’s a rundown of some of the few key themes and notable technologies that came up time and again at this year’s show. Read more of this post

Luck be a lady—twice: behind the scenes at AT&T Developer Summit’s Hackathon

JD Jordan

JD Jordan

Mapping apps are great at getting first responders to a building.
But not into it. And not at winning.

For the second year in a row, I joined the Slalom Atlanta custom development team at the 2014 AT&T Developer Summit Hackaton. And for the second year in a row, we came in second place—always the bridesmaid…ahem, bridesgroom—with our finalist app, RescueRoute, beating out nearly 120 teams after only 24 hours of design and development. Read more of this post

State-of-the-art mobile search part 8: evaluation

State-of-the-Art Mobile Search is a series exploring how to implement advanced mobile search.

State-of-the-Art Mobile Search Part 7: Spelling Correction

Rod Smith

Rod Smith

This blog series presented search features for offline-capable mobile apps. Most aspects of the solutions were explained with multiple implementation options, e.g., the TF-IDF models, unigram vs. bigram language model, noisy channel edit model, indexing term positions and/or related terms, etc. To evaluate the fitness of any particular combination of the search implementation options for a particular mobile app, it helps to quantify the quality of the search results. Read more of this post

The new normal: creating actionable mobile BI

Ryan McNaught

Ryan McNaught

We believe that as you begin to build your company’s mobile BI capabilities, it’s important to think beyond the basics. As a CIO, you are responsible for meeting the operational needs of many types of workers. To serve them well, a mobile BI solution should not simply duplicate standard dashboards and reports and present them in a different resolution. Instead, mobile BI needs to be actionable BI.

What do we mean by that? We mean that mobile BI needs to address a simple fundamental question: How will employees interact with and derive value from BI reports? The answer will most likely vary depending on the role of the employee—as it should. Mobile BI should be tailored to meet the needs of specific roles within the organization. Read more of this post

Mobile Business Intelligence (MBI): fact-based decision making

Ryan McNaught

In the United States, we’ve reached a tipping point: more than 61% of companies—up from 52% in 2010[1]—now rank MBI as a critical or very important priority. As the mobile workplace grows, industries must develop new ways to deliver information into the hands of decision makers.

CIOs generally understand that MBI is not simply a mobile version of traditional BI. Rather, there are fundamental differences between consuming data at a workstation versus on the go. To build successful projects, companies need to take these unique considerations into account. Read more of this post

State-of-the-art mobile search part 7: spelling correction

State-of-the-Art Mobile Search is a series exploring how to implement advanced mobile search.

State-of-the-Art Mobile Search Part 6: Search Execution

Rod Smith

Rod Smith

Search query terms that are absent from the corpus may be treated as potentially misspelled words. A search engine can improve the search experience by identifying potentially misspelled query words through its inverted index and by proposing likely corrections through a metric called the edit distance and an n-gram language model. Read more of this post

State-of-the-art mobile search part 6: search execution

State-of-the-Art Mobile Search is a series exploring how to implement advanced mobile search.

State-of-the-Art Mobile Search Part 5: Term Canonicalization

Rod Smith

Rod Smith

As explained in prior installments in this series, advanced search relies on term frequency and inverse document frequency. Together, those two factors reflect the importance of a term in a given document with respect to the rest of the corpus, which tells the search engine how relevant a document is given a single search term.

To optimize search execution, term frequency and independent document frequency are calculated for each term and document in the corpus before executing search queries. Then, when a search query is issued, the search engine quickly scores each document for the given search terms. Read more of this post

Pro tips for making the most of IWNY with mobile

Internet Week New York (IWNY) is the largest Internet festival in the world. The event’s hub—IWNY HQ in Silicon Alley—will attract some 10,000 attendees between May 20 and 23.

It’s exciting to be in the tech hub of New York City at Internet Week, where tomorrow’s trends are being formed today. The successful start-ups in media and technology are shaping the way our clients will better connect with their customers, partners, and employees, and the tech-elite are all here during the festival to share their experiences.

Read more of this post

State-of-the-Art Mobile Search Part 5: Term Canonicalization

State-of-the-Art Mobile Search is a series exploring how to implement advanced mobile search.

State-of-the-Art Mobile Search Part 4: Fields and Phrases

Rod Smith

Rod Smith

The inverted index built in earlier parts of this series use an undefined function canonicalize(word) to convert strings of characters into a standard form. Doing so accounts for the fact that there are multiple forms of most words in English and similar languages. Consider a query like the following:

3d printing donuts”

Crude search engines match literal words of the search query against literal words from the document collection with case insensitive substring matching. Literal substring matching is obviously deficient given its failure to match the query above against documents that contain the following:

  • “3D Printers Make Donuts Healthy”
  • “… a 3D-printed donut….”
  • “Dunkin Donuts has made a 3D printer.”

To match the search query above with those documents, search engines can employ various types of term canonicalization that ignore non-semantic details like grammatical class, so printing matches print, printed, printers, etc.  The most common approach for English-language search is known as stemming.

Read more of this post

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