An Ordinary Day with the Client

Slalom Consultant David Van De Somple

Slalom Consultant David Van De Sompele's expertise includes performance tuning, production DBA activities, data modelling, ETL processes and reporting. He's based in Slalom's Seattle office.

If a day with the client is so ordinary, what is there to write about?  That is a fair question and the answer to it is the topic of this article.

Dictionary.com defines the word ordinary as: common, mediocre and unexceptional. But if that is the value you are delivering to your client then you should consider a career other than consulting. As consultants we specialize in various technologies and methodologies.  Blending this expertise with creativity and innovation, we help companies solve complex business and technological problems.  Over time this becomes ordinary to us – it’s what we do – but this ordinary effort from the consultant should look like an extraordinary effort from the client’s perspective.

On rare occasions you may be presented with a particularly challenging situation: uncharted waters, or an unpredictable fluke for which no one has the answer.  And as a senior consultant you must be willing to dig deep and bring the entire breadth of your professional experience to bear in order to solve the problem.  To better illustrate this I’ll relate a recent experience I had.  It was one of those situations in which everything seemed to be going well until a very strange situation occurred and I was asked to jump in and solve the issue. Read more of this post

SQL Server Replication, Push vs. Pull. What is the difference?

Slalom Consultant David Van De Somple

Slalom Consultant David Van De Sompele's expertise includes performance tuning, production DBA activities, data modelling, ETL processes and reporting. He's based in Slalom's Seattle office.

Replication is a very useful method of copying data from production systems to standby servers, reporting servers, and downstream data relay points.  Unfortunately, it is an often misunderstood and/or overlooked technology, even among experienced DBAs.  In my professional career, I have often seen replication misused in an attempt to achieve a goal for which it was not intended.  When it is determined that replication is the correct solution (making that determination will be the subject of a future article), you must install and configure three basic components (these are extremely simplified definitions):

  1. Publisher:  This is the source database or databases containing the information you want to replicate.
  2. Distributor:  This is the database and set of jobs responsible for queuing replicated data from the publisher.
  3. Subscriber:  This is the destination database or databases for data coming from the publisher.

Push and Pull, as named in the title of this article,are the two methods available for Read more of this post

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